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DUAL (Drug User Advocacy League) of Ottawa was founded in the summer of 2010.  DUAL’s members are active and former users and their allies.  Visit the About section to learn more about DUAL.

This website is a comprehensive resource for DUAL members and the Ottawa community.  From here, you can contact DUAL’s Chairperson, Sean LeBlanc, learn about how to join DUAL, check out the resources and efforts of the DUAL working groups and donate.  DUAL members can also access the private members-only page for announcements and community.

If you would like to contact DUAL, visit the Contact page.

Highlights from this Week’s Harm Reduction News – September 3, 2015

Didn’t get a chance to read the news this week? Check out some of the big headlines in harm reduction. Leave a comment if we missed a story!

Nurses push for injection site support on campaign trail

Opinion: Positive impact of safe-injection sites is well-documented and immense

Want to reduce illegal immigration? End the drug war.

International Overdose Awareness Day: End the war on drug users

Primary care paramedics now being trained to use anti-opiate drug

 

Highlights from this Week’s Harm Reduction News – August 27, 2015

Didn’t get a chance to read the news this week? Check out some of the big headlines in harm reduction. Leave a comment if we missed a story!

Bloc leader calls for exemption to allow drug-injection sites in Montreal

MPs and Peers call for radical new approach to drugs laws

Stocking overdose drug in schools could save lives

Misinformed cannabis policies prevent access to life-saving treatments

Why drug testing students is un-American

New documentary makes the case for supervised heroin injection sites In New York

 

Highlights from this Week’s Harm Reduction News

Didn’t get a chance to read the news this week? Check out some of the big headlines in harm reduction. Leave a comment if we missed a story!

Tories’ false claims about pot laws put youth at risk: drug policy centre

A ‘signal’ from Harper on drug enforcement

Why is an opiate antidote harder to obtain than the drug?

Call a truce in the war on drugs

Supervised injection site proponents push on despite Harper’s opposition

Drug war enables police roadside sexual assault

Mothers share stories of their children’s opioid addictions

Heroin policy shifts toward treatment, but experts say not nearly enough

 

Highlights from this Week’s Harm Reduction News

Didn’t get a chance to read the news this week? Check out some of the big headlines in harm reduction. Leave a comment if we missed a story!

Conservatives push anti-pot message, vow funds to combat drug labs

Fentanyl overdoses: Why a safe injection site is an election issue

As fentanyl deaths rise, province distributes emergency overdose kits to addicts

The head of the DEA made a remarkable admission about marijuana

Fentanyl deaths spark call to test illegal drugs

Meet the people who want to make it safer to take drugs at festivals

Naloxone, fentanyl antidote, available in take-home kit that’s saved hundreds of lives

McGill and Concordia students to lobby for ‘sensible’ drug policies

 

FENTANYL ADVISORY!!!!

Report of increased availability of Fentanyl in Ottawa

This memo is to notify Needle and Syringe and community partners of a reported increased availability of Fentanyl locally, as well as in Ontario and other provinces. OPH has received reports from clients and community partners that Fentanyl has become more available in the city, not only in patch form but also potentially in pill and powder form. It is suspected that Fentanyl is being used to cut other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, or synthetic opiates, increasing the potency and risk of overdose with these other drugs. Risk of Fentanyl and Overdose Fentanyl is the name of a generic prescription opioid narcotic that is 50 – 80 times more potent than morphine. The reported powder form of Fentanyl has a much higher potency and requires dilution or lower levels of consumption to avoid the potential of overdose. The risk of overdose can be high and unpredictable because users do not know the actual potency or purity of the substance they are using. Signs of overdose include:  Trouble breathing or slow, shallow breathing;  Slow heartbeat;  Severe drowsiness or loss of consciousness;  Unresponsive to stimuli  Cold, clammy skin; and,  Fingernails and/or lips are blue What can Needle and Syringe and Community Partners Do? 1. Counsel clients on overdose prevention:  Avoid using alone. Fix with a friend and leave the door unlocked.  Avoid mixing drugs with prescription and over the counter drugs, alcohol, benzodiazepines, other opiates and/or uppers like cocaine or crack.  Use one drug at a time if you are mixing and take a break between drugs  Inject, snort, or smoke a very small amount first to test its strength.  Carefully check the product. Does it look, taste and smell normal?  Know your dealer and try to use from the same dealer when possible.  Talk to your dealer or other people using about the purity and strength  If you’re feeling sick or under the weather, use less and be more careful  Use less when your tolerance is low (like when you haven’t used in 3 or more days) Ottawa Public Health / Santé publique Ottawa 100 Constellation Crescent / 100, croissant Constellation Ottawa, Ontario K2G 6J8 613-580-6744 | TTY / ATS : 613-580-9656 toll free / sans frais : 1-866-426-8885 ottawa.ca/health | ottawa.ca/sante  Visit the Site office (179 Clarence) or call the Site van (613-232-3232) to get POPP training and a naloxone kit (a nurse will assess if you are eligible).  Let your community agency know if you notice any changes with your drugs.  An overdose is a medical emergency! If you or someone else is overdosing, do not hesitate to CALL 9-1-1. 2. Post advisories and information on overdose prevention in service encounter areas to notify clients. 3. Refer clients to OPH’s Site Needle and Syringe Program for overdose prevention education and peer naloxone distribution program.  Site office is located on 179 Clarence Street weekdays from 8:30-4:30 pm  Site van runs every evening from 5:00-11:30 pm and accepts collect calls 4. Monitor client experiences and notify OPH’s Site Program of any reported change in drug concentration or overdoses so we can share gathered information as a community.